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How to care for succulents and keep them alive

Here’s how to care for succulents, whether you’re just starting out or you’ve got a green thumb.

Everyone should know how to care for succulents. After all, these small, sweet plants can make a huge difference to your indoors. Whether they’re scattered around your home office, or dotted around your bedroom, succulents can improve your mood and give your decor a more natural finish. And while some can be very hardy, they still need some regular TLC; otherwise, you’ll end up looking for tips to save a dying plant.

That’s why we’ve pulled together this guide on how to care for succulents. We will look at what you should be doing, as well as what you need to avoid. So whether you’re new to the succulent-world or you’re a regular aficionado, there’s something here for everyone. Here’s how to care for your succulents and keep them thriving.

How to care for succulents

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1. Give them enough light — It might sound like common sense, but plants do need light to survive. So if you shut your succulents in an enclosed bathroom, they will inevitably die. Ideally, established succulents should get about six hours of full sun first thing in the morning, followed by partial shade for the remainder of the day.

If your succulent is more of a sapling though, too much sun can do some damage, so reduce the exposure as necessary. It’s also worth flagging that some succulents do require more light than others, especially those from the southern regions, such as cacti and yuccas. On the other hand, low light succulents also exist, such as snake plants and aloe vera.

2. Keep them watered and fed — An obvious point again, but many succulents are killed by either over or under-watering. And with so many being such a small size, this can be very easy to do. Succulents will naturally need more water in the summer, and less during the winter months. For general guidance, watering in the summer once a week is good practice, while as little as once a month may suffice in the winter.

You can always check how dry the soil feels using your finger — if the top inch feels dry, then it’s time to water. If you’re new to succulents, it’s also a good idea to use pots with drainage holes. This prevents you from over-watering, and you can re-use any excess in the tray on other succulents. You can also add a small amount of fertilizer during the spring or summer months to help with growth. We recommend Miracle-Gro Succulent Plant Food ($8.40, Amazon).

3. Watch the temperature — While succulents are pretty hardy, few will survive temperatures which drop below freezing, so keep them tucked up indoors during the colder months. Likewise, if the temperature is too high, say above 90°F, this too will kill most succulents.

Ideally, you want the temperature to range from 40-80°F for your plants to stay happy. But, remember, the higher the temperature, the more often they will need watering.

4. Rotate your pots — Wherever you’ve placed your succulents, odds are one side is not getting as much light as the other. Over time, this can result in your succulent growing in the direction of the sun and “leaning.”

Preventing this is easy: Simply rotate your plant every so often to give the other side some sun. This makes them look better and gives their growth better support.

5. Keep pests at bay — While you might think indoor succulents will be free from pests, think again. Gnats and mealybugs are attracted to damp soil and fertilizer, which can make them an unwelcome guest on your succulents.

First, you need to isolate any plants which show signs of infestation and clean the area to prevent it from spreading to others. Next, mix up a solution of one part 70 percent isopropyl alcohol and one part water. Then spray the soil as well as any pests you can see on the leaves to kill them. Make sure the succulent is free of pests before putting it back with the others.

6. Use the right soil — Soil does matter and you might be using the wrong stuff. You need a soil which isn’t too dense and allows for fast-draining, which means everyday compost won’t work. Instead, buy a dedicated succulent soil, such as The Succulent Cult Store’s Organic Potting Soil ($9.89, Amazon).

You should look to repot your succulents every two years; you should do this during its growing season. Just be careful with the roots, as these can easily be damaged.

7. Give the leaves a once over — It’s always annoying when you notice dust building up on the leaves. Some of us won’t do anything about it for fear of damaging the plant, but this myth needs to be busted.

Excessive dust can actually slow the growth of your succulent, so you’re better off getting rid of it. Plus, the colors will look much better without it. All you need to do is wipe the leaves down every so often with a damp microfiber cloth. You can also use a brush to reach any tight spaces.

For more planting tips, tricks, and how-tos, check out- Gardening


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Nuriousing Argan Oil Hair Treatment

One of the most effective ways to reap the benefits of argan oil for hair is with a hair treatment. This Argan oil hair mask is easy to make and promotes hair growth and healthy locks.

INGREDIENTS

1 ½ tablespoons argan oil

1 tablespoon coconut oil, melted**

1 tablespoon aloe vera gel

3-4 drops essential oil (optional), such as rosemary, tea tree or lavender*

INSTRUCTIONS

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Mix the ingredients in a small bowl.

Apply the hair mask mixture evenly to washed and towel dried hair. (Do not condition before using the mask)

Comb through and allow to absorb for 8-10 minutes. Cover with a shower cap for even more intense conditioning.

Rinse out with warm water then dry and style as usual.

** Jojoba oil, castor oil or olive oil would be good stand-ins if you prefer not to use coconut oil.

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Turmeric Lemon Ginger Tea

Start off your morning routine with this warm, nourishing Turmeric Lemon Ginger Tea! It’s full of antioxidants and vitamin C to start your day feeling great.

Let’s break down the nourishing, gut-friendly ingredients in this beautiful morning tea:

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TURMERIC. By now, you probably know what turmeric is (basically the new kale). It’s a spice made yellow by a compound called curcumin, which may have powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects.

LEMON. When life hands you lemons, hoard them all to make tea. We know them and love them for their vitamin C content, but they also contain a wide variety of other vitamins and minerals!

GINGER. In the same family as turmeric, ginger is a root that has been used for years and years to treat digestive issues and nausea. This study found that it’s anti-inflammatory properties can reduce muscle pain after exercise!

ORGANIC APPLE CIDER VINEGAR. This is one of those must-be-in-my-pantry-at-all-times items. It’s very important to buy apple cider vinegar unpasteurized and “with the mother” The mother is what contains all the healthy bacteria filled with antioxidants—called polyphenols—that may improve digestion, boost your immune system, soothe a sore throat, and keep your skin looking 💯.

So grab your 5 ingredients, a pot, and make this nourishing turmeric lemon ginger tea to have tomorrow morning! Your I-want-to-go-back-to-bed-right-now self will thank you. 😊

Cheers!

INGREDIENTS

🌼 4 cups water

🌻 1/4 cup Organic Apple Cider Vinegar

🍋Juice of 1 lemon

🌿 1-inch knob of ginger, thinly sliced

🌺 1 teaspoon ground turmeric, pinch of black pepper, you can add honey as well.

INSTRUCTIONS

  • In a medium saucepan over high heat, add water. Bring to a boil.
  • Remove from heat. Add Organic Apple Cider Vinegar, lemon juice, ginger, and turmeric and pinch of black pepper, honey.*
  • Let cool for 5-10 minutes before serving.
  • Store in the fridge for up to 5 days in an airtight jar or container. Shake before serving. Reheating on the stove is best!

NOTES
*Here’s a tip to avoid turmeric clumps! Add turmeric to a small bowl, then add a couple tablespoons of the hot water. Stir until smooth. Then pour into the pot with the rest of the ingredients!

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This Homemade Ginger Tea is antioxidant-rich

This Home Made Ginger Tea is a delicious (and healthy) tea made with fresh ginger, lemon juice, honey, cinnamon and cayenne pepper. It’s become part of my husband and my nightly ritual. The kids go to bed, tea simmers on the stove. It’s so comforting and I look forward to it every day.

GINGER IS DELICIOUS AND GOOD FOR YOU!

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Aside from the fact that this tea is hot, spicy and so full of flavour, it’s good for you too. We love the taste and the ritual of it, but we also drink this tea for it’s health benefits: Please note I am not a doctor, I wish I was, I lean more towards natural healing. These are just some health tidbits I found floating around the interwebs. The overall lesson here…this is just really good tea…and it’s probably good for you too. 🙂

Ginger is a natural anti-inflammatory, it helps with nausea, circulation, stomach cramps and bloating, and it also improves the absorption of nutrients.
Lemon is a rich source of Vitamin C, it helps flush toxins out of your body, it has powerful natural antibiotic properties, it’s good for your liver and skin, it helps reduce pain and inflammation in joints…
Cinnamon has been thought to help with blood sugar control, it has natural antimicrobial properties, it is rich in manganese, iron, calcium and fibre, it’s a powerful antioxidant…on and on…and it’s delicious too!
Honey is antibacterial and anti-fungal, it’s probiotic, it’s good for you skin, and it helps with sore throats and coughs.
Cayenne Pepper is a good source of essential minerals and vitamins C and A, it’s beneficial to the circulatory system…plus it adds pizzazz to your tea. True story.

So I dedicate this tea to my Mom, who also loves tea recipes. 😉❤️

How pretty are those ingredients?! Ahhhhh, I really do love this tea.

COMFORTING AND DELICIOUS DURING COLD AND FLU SEASON.

This ginger tea is so good I just had to share it with you! We drink this tea because we love it, but we also swear that it helps us ward off bugs during cold and flu season. I have nothing to prove this, but we just feel like it helps with our immunity. And when we do get sick, this tea seems to help beat it! But really, we just love ginger tea…and now maybe you will too!

GINGER TEA RECIPE TIPS:

Ginger. Peeled, fresh ginger is best for this tea.
Dressing your tea. This part is very individual-taste dependent, so play with the ingredient amounts until you get a combination that you love.

Spices. A quick little word of warning…most of the cinnamon and cayenne pepper sinks to the bottom of the tea, so you might need to stir your tea. couple of times. But you should drink that part up, that’s where all the good stuff is!

My husband and I have an on-going joke about getting that last bit down!

When you’re done steeping the ginger, pour more water on it and let it sit overnight and reheat when you’re ready for another cup.

Ingredients

1 large fresh ginger root (peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks (enough to have 8 to 10, 1-inch chunks for each root))
5 cups water
juice from 1 fresh lemon
honey
cinnamon
cayenne pepper (powder)

Instructions

In a saucepan, simmer the ginger chunks in 5 cups of water, for a minimum of 20 minutes, but the longer the better. We like to let ours simmer for 30-45 minutes.
Divide the tea between 2 large mugs, or 4 smaller mugs, making sure not to serve the chunks of ginger!

NOW IT’S TIME TO DRESS THE TEA. THIS PART IS VERY INDIVIDUAL-TASTE DEPENDENT! WE LIKE OUR TEA VERY STRONG, SO HERE’S WHAT WE ADD TO OUR TEA! FOR EACH MUG ADD:

Juice from 1/2 lemon
1/2 tsp honey
1/4 tsp cinnamon
generous dash of cayenne pepper

I hope you try it and enjoy it! Have a great day! 🙂

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BEST ESSENTIAL OILS FOR SKIN RASHES & POISON IVY NATURAL REMEDIES

Essential oils can help ease the discomfort of poison ivy rash. After all, essential oils have been used as natural remedies for many years. They offer relief from a wide array of ailments including poison ivy.

Before we cover natural remedies and essential oils for poison ivy, let’s cover the basics of this pesky plant and the symptoms it causes.

WHAT IS POISON IVY?


Poison ivy (toxicodendron radicans) is a common plant that grows in the United States. It is an as an invasive species throughout many parts of North America and can be found growing along roadsides, on fences and walls, or even in your garden.

POISON IVY RASH

The vines and leaves of the poison ivy plant emit a sticky oil called Urushiol, which can cause a contact dermatitis allergic reaction. If you are allergic to poison ivy (most people are), it may cause an immediate reaction when touched. If you have been exposed to the oil of the plant, your skin will usually develop rashes after 24 hours. Poison ivy symptoms include itchy inflamed skin and many small blisters in the skin’s affected areas.

You can even have an allergic reaction without actual physical contact with poison ivy. Urushiol oil can cause a break out just from touching tools, pets or clothing that have come in contact with the plant. The sticky oil can remain active for a long time. Urushiol has even been known to travel via air when burning brush or logs entwined with the vining plants. This can be particularly dangerous, if inhaled. You don’t catch poison ivy from someone else’s skin rash though.

Poison ivy symptoms and description. Leaves of the poison ivy plant compared with poison oak and poison sumac.

HOW TO PREVENT A RASH

Before discussing the use of essential oils in the treatment of poison ivy, let’s try and avoid the problem altogether.

The first tool in preventing exposure is learning to identify the leaves of the vine. The leaves are green and sometimes tinged with red in the spring and summer months. The leaves grow in clusters of three, hence the old saying “leaves of three, let it be”. There is sometimes a shine to the leaves, but often not.

If you are removing poison ivy, wear gloves and long sleeves and pants. Be mindful of cleaning anything that is touched by plant or your gloved hands and clean up well. Even the dried up plant has urushiol, so handle with care.


Caution: Don’t burn poison ivy, due to dangerous fumes.

IMMEDIATE ACTION


If you are exposed to poison ivy, wash immediately with soap and water. Use cool or warm water, not hot, which will open pores and invite rash.

washing hands with cool water and soap after poison ivy exposure.

You may also use rubbing alcohol or apple cider vinegar to cleanse the affected area. Both are astringent and effective at cutting the toxic oil which contains the irritant.

Remove any clothing that may have touched the poison ivy plants and wash in warm soapy water before wearing again.

Warning

Home remedies and essential oils are great for treating mild cases of poison ivy but are no substitute for professional medical advice. The reaction can go far beyond simply itchy skin in some cases.

If you are developing a rash around your eyes, mouth, genital area, or the afflicted area covers more than a quarter of your body seek medical help. Also get medical attention if you develop a fever, breathing difficulties or the rash area gets any pus or yellow scabs. [ref]

POISON OAK AND POISON SUMAC

Rashes from these poisonous plants can be treated the same way we treat poison ivy. In fact, you may not even know which rash you have. They have such similar symptoms.

9 ESSENTIAL OILS FOR POISON IVY RELIEF

If despite your best efforts to avoid poison ivy vines and wash properly when exposed, the next day you still end out with a poison ivy rash essential oils can help bring relief to your itchy skin.

TEA TREE OIL

Tea tree essential oil is distilled from the leaves of the Australian tree, Melaleuca alternifolia. The oil is often used in poison ivy remedies, since it contains terpenes such as cineole, camphor and pinene which are useful against the rash. These compounds help reduce inflammation by inhibiting histamine release. In addition, tea tree oil helps prevent infection by killing bacteria like Staphylococcus Aureus.

LAVENDER ESSENTIAL OIL


Lavender essential oil contains linalool, limonene and geraniol. Linalool inhibits the production of prostaglandins responsible for swelling and itching. Geraniol reduces irritation caused by urushiol. Limonene has helpful anti-inflammatory properties. Lavender oil relieves pain and promotes skin healing. It is also antibacterial which is aids in avoiding infection of open skin areas from scratching.

This oil is used in my oatmeal bath recipe, which is a natural remedy that is very helpful in easing the discomfort of poison ivy rashes. It is a great way to aid in treatment of young children before bedtime. Just make sure you use lukewarm to cool water, rather than hot water.

PEPPERMINT ESSENTIAL OIL

Peppermint oil is often recommended for treating poison ivy rashes. Its menthol has a cooling effect which helps soothe redness and itchiness. Methyl chavicol works against bacterial infections and eucalyptol provides analgesic properties.

Peppermint oil along with soothing aloe vera, witch hazel and lavender oil are all used in my Sunburn Relief Spray, the spray would also ease the discomfort of a poison ivy outbreak.

CHAMOMILE ESSENTIAL OIL

The calming and soothing characteristics of Roman chamomile essential oil make it a good alternative for all skin types, even those with sensitive skin. Roman chamomile essential oil is also great for bug bites, skin allergies and of course, rashes like poison ivy.

Tip: Don’t have chamomile oil on-hand. Soak chamomile tea bags in warm water, then chill to use as a cold compress on the affected area to reduce inflammation.

YLANG YLANG ESSENTIAL OIL


This oil is rich in sesquiterpenes called nerolidols. Nerolidol is a sedative compound that calms nerves and relaxes muscles. It is also helpful in reducing anxiety and stress. The scent of ylang ylang is very relaxing and calming.

ROSEMARY ESSENTIAL OIL


Rosemary oil is great for soothing irritated skin. The oil contains rosmadial, carvacrol and thymol. Rosmadial is antiseptic and antimicrobial. Thymol is antibacterial and antiviral, which is great for avoiding infection of a blistering rash. Carvacrol is an antioxidant and insect repellent.

EUCALYPTUS ESSENTIAL OIL


If you want to cleanse the rash, use Eucalyptus oil as it can help remove urushiol, which is a cause of irritation and has antiseptic properties. It will also help to keep the skin hydrated and prevent flaky skin at the end of the healing process. Eucalyptus (eucalyptus globulus) is recommended to be used when your poison ivy rash is nearly gone, to aid in final healing.

GERANIUM ESSENTIAL OIL


Geranium oil works wonders for skin, but it’s really amazing when it comes to allergic reactions such as the rash from contact with urushiol. The oil stops the release of extra histamines thus reducing the inflammatory reaction itself. It may be helpful in limiting the immune system reaction and calming inflamed skin.

MYRRH ESSENTIAL OIL


The antimicrobial properties of myrrh make it one of my favorite natural ingredients for treating any rash and encouraging the healing process.

HOW TO USE ESSENTIAL OILS FOR POISON IVY


When you use essential oils for poison ivy, it is important to dilute them before applying to the skin. This is especially true for sensitive areas or of there is even the slightest break in the skin. Diluting them with other natural remedies for poison ivy, sumac and poison oak rash boosts results.

CALAMINE


One of the first things most of us will do when facing a poison ivy rash is apply calamine lotion or soap to the itchy rash. The zinc oxide in calamine is primarily what brings relief, by drying out the rash. You can add a couple drops of essential oil to the lotion to boost effectiveness.

If you are sensitive to calamine, try making a simple bentonite clay or baking soda paste to aid in gently drying out the skin area. Simply mix with a little lukewarm water and a couple drops of essential oils.

CARRIER OIL

Of course, a carrier oil can be used to apply essential oils to the area. Virgin coconut oil is the ideal choice for this.

SALT WATER

Perhaps you have noticed your rash fading faster after a trip to the beach. the salt and minerals in ocean water help dry up a poison ivy rash. We don’t want to put the proverbial salt in the wound, but if your rash is not oozing a cotton ball dunked in a mild saline solution with an essential oil booster may just be the solution you are looking for.

ALOE VERA

Mixing your oils into aloe vera gel is a great choice when skin conditions are a bit rougher. If you have small abrasions in the affected area from scratching, this will help soothe the symptoms and accelerate skin healing.

ASTRINGENTS

Natural astringents such as apple cider vinegar and witch hazel not only help dry out the tiny blisters from the rash, but also provide immediate relief to the area, since they create a cooling sensation as they evaporate.

Colloidal Oatmeal

OATS

Oatmeal bath can be an effective remedy for poison ivy. Colloidal oatmeal actually leaves a thin protective coating on the skin and encourages healing. Lavender, chamomile and eucalyptus are great choices to use in an oat bath for rashes.

Poison Ivy Gel Treatment

Essential Oil Poison Ivy Gel Author: The Naturally Blooming Total Time: 2 minutes

This quick simple essential oil gel will help ease the symptoms of poison ivy. A natural poison ivy remedy for mild cases.

INGREDIENTS
2-ounce glass bottle

1 ½ tablespoons Aloe vera gel
½ tablespoon witch hazel
5 drops peppermint essential oil
5 drops of geranium essential oil
5 drops of rosemary essential oil


INSTRUCTIONS
Pour the aloe vera gel and witch hazel into the bottle with a small funnel.
Add the essential oil blend and shake well.

NOTES

Home remedies are only meant for mild to moderate poison ivy symptoms. Seek medical advice if your rash is near eyes, other sensitive body parts or covers 25% or more of your body. You should also do so if fever, loss of breath or pus comes from the rash area.

It is also wise to do a test patch before applying any oils you have not used in the past, even when diluted. An adverse reaction on top of a painful rash needs to be avoided.

Prep Time: 2 min

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Homemade All Natural, Facial Recipes

These are natural, food-based, creams and cleansers — I’m betting you’ve got all the ingredients you’ll need in your kitchen right now. So, let’s get started! Glowing skin, straight ahead!

ACNE-PRONE AND OILY SKIN


A lot of people avoid the word oil when it comes to buying products for their skin. They think they have oily skin already and that’s a bad thing, so adding more oil to it will make it worse. But I wish everyone would throw that mindset out the window today and never let it back in!

Oil dissolves oil. Say it with me: Oil dissolves oil. Cleansers for oily skin tend to be drying, so your sebaceous glands, which are microscopic glands in the skin that secrete the oil, are going to go into overdrive because they are getting the message that all the oil is gone and they then produce even more oil than before. That leads to more blocked pores, more blemishes, more oil, more cleansing, and round and round it goes.

Let’s start with a cleansing option. You’ll need two oils for this part. First is castor oil. This is your base oil, and you will not be using a lot of it. For oily skin you will use 30% castor oil to 70% of your secondary oil choice. You might want to tweak the amounts depending on your own personal results. You know those travel-sized shampoo bottles? Perfect size in which to mix your cleanser.

Your secondary oil will be a vegetable oil or sunflower seed oil or sweet almond oil. I like extra virgin olive oil. Castor oil will remove the impurities in your skin, has anti-inflammatory properties, and will heal your skin as well. The EVOO prevents dryness. Remember, if you use too much castor oil you will end up with super dry skin.

Once it’s mixed, pour a puddle into the palm of your hand, rub your hands together to warm it, and start to massage your face. For the castor oil to do its job properly, massage for five minutes. I say five because everyone always does three! Then, take a hot washcloth and lay it over your face, leaving it there until it’s cool. Wipe away the oil with the washcloth. You will probably have to repeat this step two or three times to make sure you’ve removed all the oil. This is actually where many people stop because they find that their skin is moisturized enough just from the cleansing. And you can stop here if this is how you cleanse your skin frequently, but if you want that little extra treat of a facial you can continue with the next steps. I will add that if you start to do the oil cleansing method, you really should do it only at night before bed; if you are washing your face at night, there is no need to wash it in the morning. And bonus! A lot of people don’t find the need to cleanse every night once they start with this method.

Next is toner. 

Mix two teaspoons of organic apple cider vinegar – it must be organic – and two teaspoons of tap water. Dip a cotton ball into the mix and wipe your face. If you find the vinegar too strong of a smell, wait five minutes after toning and then rinse with water. Otherwise, continue on with the facial. If you find your skin reacts to the vinegar, dilute it more with the water. If you rather not use acv, try using green tea instead. Make a strong cup of it and fill a little bottle with it. You could use a spray bottle and then spray it on a cotton pad or just right over your face and let it dry.

On to exfoliating! 

Grind one tablespoon of oats, add one tablespoon of honey, apply to your face, and rub in gentle circles for three to five minutes. Rinse off with water.

And now for the mask, 

which is my favorite step because you get to be a scientist and mix up ingredients any way you want! This one is a lemon and egg-white mask. Lemon is rich in Vitamin C, it’s great for getting rid of sun spots and uneven skin tone, and it will help exfoliate. You will notice tightness once you apply the egg whites, but that will go away once you remove the mask.

Beat one egg-white until it’s frothy. Add lemon juice (the equivalent of half of a lemon) to the egg-white, apply it to your face avoiding the eye area, leave on for 15 minutes up to 30 minutes, and rinse off with warm water.

I like to use coconut oil as a finishing cream. Choose the organic, unrefined kind. It is a hard white substance when cold, but at 24 degrees Celsius it melts and becomes oil. Melt about half a tablespoon in your hands, and massage your face with it.

You may find that your skin will get a bit worse before it gets better. Apple cider vinegar will definitely open up blockages and a lot of oil will be released, which can cause more breakouts. But be patient: it will subside once your skin adjusts to how nicely you are treating it!

DRY SKIN

To cleanse dry skin, use the oil cleansing method described above, but adjust your oil amounts. Your mixture will be a blend of 10% castor oil to 90% of your secondary oil. Again, extra virgin olive oil is my favorite choice.

Pineapple coconut water is a brilliant toner for those of us with dry skin. So refreshing with just a simple swipe over your face with a clean cotton ball. And to exfoliate, grind up some oatmeal, mix with yogurt or kefir, apply to your face, and leave for ten minutes before rinsing off. If you enjoy a good mask, mash half of a very ripe avocado and add approximately a quarter cup of honey. Apply to skin and leave on for ten minutes, rinsing completely with a washcloth. As for finishing cream, my newest discovery is cold-pressed avocado oil. It is very concentrated in vitamin E and other antioxidants. Just a dab of avocado oil on the cheeks and forehead, then massage in. It takes about ten minutes to absorb. If it takes longer, you’ve applied too much.

ANTI-AGING

Again, I favor the oil cleansing method, but an anti-aging cleanser’s ratio will be 20% castor oil to 80% secondary oil. For toner, dip your cotton ball into pineapple coconut water and swipe all over your face.

Lack of moisture in the skin is definitely going to make fine lines more pronounced. Since aging skin shares the same concern as dry skin, the exfoliation technique is the same: oatmeal mixed with yogurt or kefir, applied and left on for ten minutes before rinsing off.

I have two mask options for aging skin.

For the first mask, mash up one ripe banana and mix with two tablespoons honey. Apply to your face, leave for ten to 15 minutes, and remove. The banana is going to tingle like crazy; if you feel it burning, remove immediately. If you have sensitive skin, you might want to do a test patch first. Bananas are known as nature’s Botox. Yes, you read that right! Bananas leave your skin firmer, the vitamins A and B will fade dark spots and lighten the skin tone, vitamin E fights free radical damage, and the potassium is very hydrating. Honey is a lot of things including anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial, but we’re using it in this facial because it will help reduce the appearance of fine lines.

Another anti-aging mask option is mixing a half tablespoon of L. Ascorbic Acid (vitamin C) and one teaspoon olive oil. Apply to face carefully. If it gets in your eyes, it will burn.

I tried to find an easy-to-make-with-pantry-items anti-aging finishing cream, but none of them felt right to me so I will just tell you what I do & is great for mature skin as well. This will be the most expensive part of any of the facial steps I’ve listed, but it’s absolutely divine. Two tablespoons each of sweet almond oil and rose hip seed oil, and ten drops each of cypress oil, which is very firming for the skin, and geranium oil, which regenerates the skin. You can store this in a glass amber bottle. Use only at night, and don’t use too much unless you want to be super greasy.

A few additional notes: I always recommend doing a patch test first to see what kind of reaction you get to any skin care routine. Any mixture using fruit or eggs needs to be made and then used right away; there is no storing of that kind of thing. Which is one thing that freaks me out the most about store-bought beauty products: some of the stuff I used had a shelf life of up to two years! And make your at-home process as easy as possible so you’ll treat your skin regularly. I keep a container with ground oatmeal in it to make it easier to scoop out whenever I need it.

–-

Oh, goodness. Don’t those sound fantastic? I want to head straight to the kitchen to mix up some skin care! I’m definitely feeling empowered to treat my skin kindly and gently — and cheaply!

What about you, Friends? Any homemade skin care recipes that have worked for you? And have you tried any of the solutions suggests in the post? How did they work for you?

Maria J 💜 – The Naturally Blooming

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Headaches 101: Major causes and natural healing

Did you know a common side effect of most prescription medications is dehydration? Feeling dizzy or lightheaded? It’s probably those pharma medications that were made in a laboratory to cover up the symptoms of bad eating habits and lack of enough clean, filtered water. You may be surprised at the main causes of headaches, and you may be going about curing them all wrong.

Here are the top 7 causes of headaches

#1. Prescription medications- seriously look into the ingredients of what in the world is in them.

#2. Fluoride in tap water. opt for a water filter, here is a good one I am using with a decent price tag, Water Filter

#3. Artificial ingredients in foods

#4. Concentrated salts, including MSG, nitrates and nitrites

#5. Not drinking enough water: However, if you’re consuming several of the other headache causes on this list, you’ll need more.

#6. Deferred neck and back pain from bad posture and muscle abuse

#7. Aspirin, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, triptans, NSAID, plus most addictive pain relievers (opioid-based) etc…

Overuse of headache and pain relievers causes chronic, severe headaches

You’re probably asking “how” right now, as you wonder why the OTC medications you buy for headache relief literally cause headaches, right? One of the biggest medical problems ever perpetrated around the world is the “take one aspirin a day to prevent heart attacks and strokes” which is a lie. That’s a dangerous guessing game that some doctors play. There are NO good ‘candidates’ for aspirin therapy, and one major side effect is chronic, intolerable headaches from overuse (daily use).

Ever heard of rebound headaches? They come from overuse of pain medicine, which is running rampant in America and around the world, thanks to many MD’s bad advice and not looking into the many natural medicines alternatives instead opioids are being dished out for just about anything. As your pain reliever wears off, the headache returns even WORSE than it was before. Doctors know this because millions of patients complain about it. Got chronic migraines? It’s the medication you’re taking for chronic migraines that’s making it worse. It’s a sad truth that is not talked about enough even though this is a very important and crucial topic. Let that sink in for a minute.

Science and research have shown that nitrates and MSG increase the dilatation of your blood vessels, causing severe headaches and inflammation. Some prescription drugs for blood pressure literally contain nitrates, causing intolerable migraine headaches. The doctors all know this too, but can’t talk about it, and don’t want to, because they receive very large and illegal kickbacks, ‘spiffs’ and expensive gifts from the pharmaceutical distributors (shilling pharma reps).

Included are very controversial. Birth control pills, diet pills, menopause prescriptions and erection enhancement medications can all cause chronic and severe headaches, but again, when most docs prescribe most prescriptions, they won’t mention it. So why don’t we ask the side effects of taking these drugs? It is definitely worth taking some independent time and researching about all of this and seeking out natural alternatives, asking questions before taking anything that can be even more harmful in the long run.

Bad posture and muscle abuse


Most people have no clue that they have horrible posture throughout the day, including myself if I don’t catch it while sitting on a chair for hours on end, and even while walking, preparing food, and staring into our smart devices. Believe it or not, your head weighs around 10 to 12 pounds, and it’s supported by 20 muscles that get overworked and abused when you lean forward or over for extended periods of time.

Let’s take a look at ourselves right now. 🙂 Is our head tilted downward, even slightly? If so, your lower back is suffering. So are those 20 muscles that hold your head like that. Let’s try to remember to constantly stand up and take a few minutes to stretch our neck, back and muscles. Referred pain can trick you into thinking your headache has a different cause or source. Pay close attention to this. Natural Chiropractic care can be pivotal for curing chronic headaches and migraines. Start examining your posture at all times throughout the day. Taking computer breaks and stretching those muscles is a good idea for stiffness.

Natural cures for common headaches

Dehydration also fuels inflammation, especially when it comes to arthritis and joint pain increase. Wait, you didn’t know? Up to 80 percent of your joint cartilage consists of water, including the thick lubrication between the joints. Make sure you’re drinking clean, filtered water. Bottled water isn’t always the best idea, as it can contain BPA, PFA’s, fluoride and other chemical contaminants that drive headaches. A great, reliable gravity filter is a Berkey water filtration system for your home if possible or a good water filter that alkalizes your water. You can also test your ph in your water.

Thier can be different situations based on the person’s health, maybe it can be from needing glasses as well. But overall, for everyone a mayor change will Include your diet choices. As much as possible Go for whole organic foods vitamins, nutrition, minerals and anti-inflammatory herbs and spices which help to reduce headaches and inflammation such as turmeric. If suffering from chronic migraines visit a naturopathic physician and see if they can recommend more natural remedies over synthetic products.

I hope this article served as an informative “food for thought” and gave some insight on headaches and overall health. As with anything take the time to research as well. And take it one day at a time for your body to heal. ❤️

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15 Body Massage Oils And Their Benefits

Let’s look into 15 Body Massage Oils And Their Benefits

Nothing takes away the stress and rejuvenates your mind and body as a relaxing oil massage. Body massages relax the tissues and muscles and help you unwind. And using the right oil can make all the difference. The benefits of body massage oils go beyond providing the necessary slip for a perfect massage. The best oil can hydrate your skin, provide nourishment to keep it soft and glowing.

Some nourishing oils may even safeguard the skin from inflammatory conditions and soothe other skin issues. Therefore, pick your body oil wisely. To help you decide, we have listed the 15 best body massage oils you can get and explained their benefits. Read on.

In This Article



1. Olive Oil
2. Coconut Oil
3. Sweet Almond Oil
4. Avocado Oil
5. Jojoba Oil
6. Grapeseed Oil
7. Sunflower Oil
8. Argan Oil
9. Peanut Oil
10. Sesame Oil
11. Shea Butter
12. Apricot Kernel Oil
13. Pomegranate Seed Oil
14. Castor Oil
15. Organic Black seed oil

1. Olive Oil


Olive oil is generally used for lighter massages, such as a Swedish massage. It is an heavy oil and gets absorbed into the skin at a much slower rate. That’s why it is widely used in massages that involve using repetitive movements and sweeping your body. It has been a part of the Mediterranean culture for thousands of years. in their cuisines and medicines, and for other therapeutic purposes.

Benefits Of Olive Oil


Olive oil helps in repairing skin damage by reducing oxidative stress when massaged in the right way.
Massaging with olive oil reduces muscle fatigue, alleviates muscle pain.
Olive oil helps in improving the blood flow to fatigued muscles and faster removal of lactic acid, which results in faster recovery of the muscles.

2. Coconut Oil

Benefits Of Coconut Oil


Many people think that coconut oil is dense and greasy, but it is just the opposite. It is light and non-greasy, and it gets absorbed into the skin quickly. It contains medium-chain triglycerides and is, hence, good for massages that involve shorter strokes (used for target muscles). Coconut oil is mostly used in heavy massages, such as deep tissue and prenatal massages, Shiatsu, and reflexology. Fractionated coconut oil (also known as virgin coconut oil) is the best for massages as it has several benefits.


It contains medium-chain fatty acids, making it pretty stable. Upon massaging, it gets absorbed into your skin.
It does not let moisture escape from your skin. Since it is a stable oil, it is full of saturated fats that prevent drying and keep your skin moisturized. It is especially beneficial in treating mild to moderate levels of xerosis.
Coconut oil has antioxidant and antibacterial properties. It also repairs the skin barrier.
It is also a good carrier oil (meaning, you can add essential oils to it).

3. Sweet Almond Oil


This oil is widely used by massage therapists and is a pale yellow oil with a mild and sweet fragrance. Sweet almond oil is a bit greasy and lets your hands glide smoothly on the skin. However, it is not a heavy oil and is absorbed by your skin quickly (but not so quickly that you will need reapplication). It suits all skin types and usually does not irritate the skin.

Benefits Of Sweet Almond Oil


It is very mild and gentle on the skin – so mild that it can be used on a baby’s skin. It also has anti-inflammatory properties. It relieves itching and rashes, especially in conditions like dermatitis, eczema, and psoriasis.
It prevents skin damage caused by exposure to UV radiation. Thus, it can prevent tanning and sun damage.
A study conducted on patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) has found that massaging with sweet almond oil can reduce muscle pain.

4. Avocado Oil


This deep green oil is cold-pressed from avocados and is quite heavy. It is mixed with lighter oils before massaging. This oil contains natural latex, so avoid using it if you are allergic to latex.

Benefits Of Avocado Oil


Avocado oil is a storehouse of essential vitamins and nutrients, such as linoleic acid, oleic acid, linolenic acid, beta-carotene, beta-sitosterol, lecithin, and vitamins A, C, D, and E. Thus, it has anti-inflammatory properties. This oil also boosts skin regeneration. The topical application of avocado oil boosts collagen synthesis. Thus, it may help improve the elasticity of your skin and make it soft and supple.

5. Jojoba Oil


Although it is referred to as an oil, jojoba oil is not actually an oil. It is a type of wax that is extracted from the seeds of the jojoba plant. However, it is not greasy and does not stain your sheets and it has antibacterial properties. It is usually used for back massage as it is said to be good for treating back acne. It gets absorbed quickly by the skin, and hence requires reapplication.

Benefits Of Jojoba Oil


It repairs your skin barrier that is damaged due to eczema, seborrheic dermatitis, acne, and acute dermatitis. This is because jojoba oil is rich in wax ester and anti-inflammatory properties, which make it perfect for taking care of your skin. Jojoba oil is an excellent choice for aromatherapy massage as it can be mixed with herbs and essential oils easily. It also does not irritate your skin, which is why it is preferred for a body massage at spas.

6. Grapeseed Oil


Grapeseed oil is light and feels silky when applied to your skin. Compared to any other massage oil, this oil gives a rich feeling and makes your skin glossy. It has little to no odor and is an excellent choice for a relaxing massage. However, it can stain your sheets.

Benefits Of Grapeseed Oil


Grape seed oil contains resveratrol. Resveratrol has antimicrobial properties when applied topically. It prevents the growth of pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus faecalis.
It is loaded with vitamin E, linoleic acid, and phenolic compounds that keep your skin healthy and prevent inflammation.
Grapeseed oil is a perfect carrier oil. You can mix essential oils and other herbs with it.

7. Sunflower Oil


This light and thin oil are used for cooking as well as massaging. Sunflower oil turns rancid quickly. So, it is better to buy it in small quantities and store it in a cool and dry place. Squeezing one or two vitamin E capsules in the oil also improves its shelf life.

Benefits Of Sunflower Oil


Sunflower oil enhances the texture of your skin by improving its moisture levels.
Massaging your skin with sunflower oil improves the barrier repair function of your skin. Thus, it may have an anti-aging effect on your skin.
Sunflower oil contains essential fatty acids that rejuvenate your skin. Regular massage with this oil gives you glowing and radiant skin.

8. Argan Oil


Pure argan oil is used in spas for body massage. A massage with argan oil is usually done right after a relaxing warm bath. Argan oil is light and non-greasy. It softens your skin instantly.

Benefits Of Argan Oil


Massaging your skin with argan oil improves its elasticity. It keeps your skin moisturized and improves its hydration levels. It also improves the water-holding capacity of your skin. This can prevent dryness and make your skin glowing and healthy.
A deep tissue massage with argan oil is said to relax sore muscles and eases swelling and joint pain.

9. Peanut Oil


Peanut oil is also used in spas for massage. However, a few people might be allergic to it, which is why it is important to do a patch test before using this oil. Peanut oil is also known as groundnut oil. People generally warm up peanut oil and then massage it all over their bodies. This relieves muscle and tissue pain and soothes your aching joints.

Benefits Of Peanut Oil


Peanut oil has a hydrating effect on your skin without increasing the transepidermal water loss.
There is anecdotal evidence that peanut oil nourishes your skin, energizes your body, and relieves muscle and joint pain when used regularly.

Due to its mild aroma, peanut oil is mostly used for aromatherapy massage, which is a rejuvenating and relaxing experience.

10. Sesame Oil


This oil is highly regarded as a massage oil in Ayurveda. A massage with sesame oil is believed to strengthen your body structure that includes the ligaments, muscles, and tendons. It is a thick oil and may leave your skin feeling oily and greasy.

Benefits Of Sesame Oil


Sesame oil is an integral part of Taiwanese medicine, where it is mainly used to relieve inflammatory pain in the joints.
Massaging with sesame oil helps reduce skin damage caused by UV exposure.
In Ayurveda, sesame oil is used for abhyanga. This is an Ayurvedic massage technique that involves warming the oil and then mixing it with herbs before massaging it on your body.

11. Shea Butter

Shea butter is extracted from the seeds of the shea tree. Shea butter is the fat of the seeds. At room temperature, it is solid and looks like butter. It is quite heavy and feels greasy on your skin. Hence, spas combine it with lighter oils before using it for massaging. Shea butter contains natural latex, so avoid using it if you have a latex allergy.

Benefits Of Shea Butter

Shea butter contains anti-inflammatory compounds, such as tocopherols, sterols, phenols, and triterpenes. Thus, it has potent antioxidant properties. This is the reason shea butter is extremely popular in the beauty industry and used in creams and for massage purposes.

12. Apricot Kernel Oil

Apricot oil is extracted from the bitter kernels of the fruit. It is also known as bitter apricot oil, and its texture is very similar to almond oil (which is also extracted from the kernels of almond). This oil is rich in vitamin E. It has a longer shelf life than any other massage oil. It is light and gets easily absorbed into the skin. It is mostly used for aromatherapy massage (Swedish massage).

Benefits Of Apricot Kernel Oil Or Bitter Apricot Oil

Bitter apricot oil is used in traditional medicine for treating skin diseases. It hydrates and nourishes the skin and prevents dryness. It is considered a useful massage oil for treating psoriasis.

This oil has a smooth texture and gets absorbed quickly. It has emollient properties. This means that it keeps the skin hydrated and makes it appear tight, plump, and healthy.

13. Pomegranate Seed Oil 

The pomegranate seed oil has a pleasant smell and is used in relaxing and rejuvenating massages. It is rich in vitamin E and phytosterols that keep your skin beautiful and hydrated. This oil is extremely light and does not make your skin greasy or oily. Therefore, it is best suited for deep massages.

Benefits Of Pomegranate Oil

Pomegranate oil is used mainly for its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Massaging your body with a mixture of pomegranate oil and Croton lechleri resin extract has been to improve the elasticity, texture, and hydration levels of the skin.

14. Black Seed Oil

Black Seed Oil is made from the Nigella Sativa plant, which is native to Asia, India and many places around the world. The plant is technically a member of the Buttercup family and has small, black, crescent-shaped seeds.

Benefits of Black Seed Oil

Very rich and potent vitamins and minerals used as medicines for treatment of diseases and contribution it provides to human health;

Vitamin A includes H, C, B1, B2 and B6. As for mineral; Selenium, zinc, magnesium-containing black seed is the most important composition of thymol derivative. As an active ingredient, thymoquinon, non-volatile oils and nigellone-containing black seed, as well as palmitic acid, linoic acid, oleic acid, sodium, potassium, calcium, zinc, iron, magnesium, copper, phosphorus and selenium, vitamin A, vitamin B and contains vitamin C.

Thymoquinone, as an important ingredient of black seed, is a source of healing for many diseases. It reduces symptoms of such as bronchitis, allergies, arthritis, asthma, rheumatism, lowering blood sugar and reducing uric acid. And great when used as a body massage which can reduce inflammation and pain on joints when used regularly.

15. Castor Oil

Castor oil is great as a natural moisturizer for the skin due to its unique ingredients. It is rich in ricinoleic acid, which is a monounsaturated fatty acid. This fatty acid––when applied to the skin––works as a humectant and draws moisture from the air into your skin to keep it hydrated.

Benefits of Castor oil

Additionally, the triglycerides in castor oil help to maintain moisture in your skin and prevent water loss by creating a thick protective layer on the skin’s surface. However, if you are interested in learning how to hydrate skin with the use of castor oil, it’s important to note that since castor oil is very thick and strong, it should always be mixed with a carrier oil before applying it to your skin.

Before you pick any oil, make sure that you are not allergic to it. Otherwise, it can cause serious skin issues. Also, there are a few more important things to consider before picking a massage oil.

Important Things To Consider Before Choosing A Massage Oil 

  • Check for purity: Pick pure oils. Massage oils should not contain additives and preservatives as they might dilute the benefits of the oil. Pure oils feel light to touch and are less greasy.
  • Check the viscosity: The oil should glide smoothly on your skin. It should not feel sticky and greasy. Massage oils should allow easy hand movements on the skin.
  • Check the odor: Avoid using oils that have a strong odor. Usually, massage oils have a light and pleasant fragrance, so pick accordingly.

Also, do a patch test with the oil before using it for a massage to check for allergic reactions. Choose any oil from this list and reap its benefits. You can add essential oils and herbs before massaging gently it on your skin. This will maximize your sensory experience. None of these oils are harmful (unless you are allergic to a particular ingredient). So, the next time you are trying to recover from the stress of a long day at work, try a body massage with any of these massage oils. And, don’t forget to share your feedback! Until then, stay healthy and keep glowing! 🌻

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Here’s How You Can Optimize Your Natural Immune System

Natural immunity is our body’s natural system of protection against micro-organisms including bacteria, parasites, and viruses. We can protect ourselves against any number of pathogens.

This guide provides a basic outline of the immune system and an introduction to optimizing immune function through food, lifestyle choices, herbs, and supplements.

The immune system

The immune system is a multi layered shield for the body. It includes many types of cells that work together to fight infection and protect against disease. These cells identify, mark, and destroy pathogens.

The organs and tissues of the immune system are found throughout the body: 

  • Skin and mucous membranes
  • Lymph nodes and lymphatic vessels
  • Spleen
  • Thymus
  • Bone marrow
  • Tonsils and adenoids

The immune system produces specific proteins called antibodies that have several key roles in protective immunity and in response to infection.

A good-functioning immune system is critical for staying healthy. There is a considerable volume of science demonstrating how dietary and lifestyle choices, as well as certain food supplements and herbs, can improve the immune system.

Therefore, the potential of natural substances to strengthen the immune system has long been the subject of investigation, and this is supported by traditional knowledge in terms of the use of herbs.

We now know that optimal immune function requires optimal nutrition and that exercise, stress, sleep, and natural light exposure also play a functional role.

The food we consume

Foods we consume

It is important to know what you put in your body and to limit consumption of harmful foods, because they are lacking of nutrients. It’s also better to get the ingredients and freshly prepare food, because volume of vitamins and other micro-nutrients are reduced by cooking methods and storage.

Proteins and amino acids are necessary for antibody production and normal immune function along with vitamins A, B, C, D, E; minerals including zinc, iron, selenium, magnesium; and essential fatty acids.

Fruits and vegetables are natural immunity superfoods and contain natural plant chemicals such as flavonoids. To break down food A higher intake of fruits and vegetables leads to a reduction in inflammation and enhancement of immunity, as shown in a systematic review and meta analysis of 83 studies

Organic Apples, citrus fruits, blueberries, onions, broccoli, kale, tomatoes, green tea, other teas, cacao, whole grains, and certain herbs and spices including thyme and turmeric are flavonoid rich foods. Flavonoids and a soluble fibre called beta-glucans help to reduce inflammation and regulate the immune system.

Oats, barley, and mushrooms are beta-glucans, as research shows. The beneficial effects of β-glucan-containing mushrooms have been long known and are traditionally utilized in Oriental medicine for strengthening the body’s immune system. Examples are the Shiitake (Lentinus edodes) of Japanese origin and Lingzhi (Ganoderma lucidum), used in Chinese medicine.

Kefir, live natural yoghurt, kombucha, and sauerkraut are probiotic foods that help to support optimal immune function by improving gut function and via immune modulation.

Exercise is good

Regular exercise, research shows, is essential for maintaining a healthy immune system and countering the effects of aging on immune function.

Exercise strengthens the body’s ability to fight off infection. Regularly engaging in moderate exercise or even simple exercise is beneficial for immune defense. The key is to sweat for the release of unwanted chemicals. Everyone Notably, older adults and those with chronic disease benefit significantly with movement and regular exercise. 

Rest is best

Sleep and the biological clock, the circadian rhythm, have a significant influence on immune function. Diet and lifestyle help to regulate the biological clock and promote healthy sleep via the production of melatonin.

Soak up the sun

Sunlight enables the production of vitamin D—the sunshine vitamin, in the skin. A major cause of vitamin D deficiency is inadequate exposure to sunlight. However, vitamin D is available in some foods naturally—fish liver oil and fatty fish, and fortified milk products, orange juice, and breakfast cereals. An estimated 50% of people worldwide are vitamin D deficient.

Supplements are key

Vitamin C, vitamin D, and Zinc have been widely researched and used for natural immune support and optimization for years. 

Vitamins A, E and B complex, essential fatty acids, selenium, magnesium, iron and copper, beta-glucans, and flavonoids and a good quality multivitamin and mineral are especially important when diet is not ideal.

Probiotics can also be supplemented.

A cup of tea

Herbal remedies and teas such as green tea, mint tea, white pine needle tea, echinacea, and pelargonium can be taken to support and balance the immune system. They can also be used at the first signs of illness, such as a sore throat.

Elderberry has traditionally been used in reducing the duration of colds and flu.

Chronic stress has been shown to suppress immunity
Adaptogens are a class of herbs that include licorice, astragalus and ashwagandha. They have the unique ability to improve an individual’s ability to cope with stress by promoting the ability to adapt and therefore protect against all types of stressors including physical, emotional, chemical, and biological.

These herbs can directly modify the immune system, stabilize various physical functions, and bring things back into balance when taken in times of increased stress. They normalize the physiological process of the body and help the body adapt to change.

Astragalus is a Chinese herb that has been used over centuries for general immune support. It has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antiviral properties.

Licorice is a well-known herbal medicine used worldwide over thousands of years. Accumulating evidence has shown its potential to balance the immune system. It also has natural antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties.

The immune system responds to the stress of challenging circumstances. Chronic stress can lead to increased inflammation in the body and is associated with activation of latent viruses. This explains the re-activation of cold sores (caused by the herpes virus) during times of stress.

Every person manages stress differently. Some are more able to adapt and cope with chronic stress than others.

frequency of exercise, and social support systems all have important roles to play. Certain nutrients are depleted by stress, and therefore those with poor nutritional status are likely to fair worse.

It’s time to optimize your immune system
Eating healthy foods, getting plenty of sleep, exercising regularly, keeping stress levels low, and supplementing appropriately keep our immune systems supported and ready to fend off a host pathogens, including virus.

Trusting in God first overall who created creation and the herbs for the healing of the body.

It’s a blessing that God created our bodies to build its defenses against infection and create a harmony with nature without being directed by expensive pharmaceuticals. You are gifted with an amazing natural immune system that can be optimized to its full potential using the tools presented here.

If you found this article useful or know someone that it could help, please take a moment to share it! 🌿

HOW TO STORE FRESH CILANTRO

Are you a fresh herb lover? Have you ever wondered how to store fresh cilantro and other herbs a way that will help last them longer? There is an easy way to store leafy herbs that can make them last up to 6 weeks!

What’s the secret? Treat bunches of cilantro just like you treat fresh-cut flowers!

Like a florist, you need to trim the ends of your leafy herbs, place them in fresh, cool water and store them in a fridge. Once a week or so you need to replace the water and retrim the ends. Freshly trimmed ends will be able to absorb more water, allowing the herbs to stay fresh.

You can loosely cover your herbs with a plastic bag once they are trimmed and in cool water. I use a disposable bag from the grocery store vegetable section (I usually get one with my cilantro).  Or ziplock bags work as well Herbs can also be stored uncovered. See which works well in your fridge, it depends on the humidity in your area.

My cilantro lasts a LONG time with or without a plastic bag cover. Just remember to trim it regularly and keep the water fresh. This storage tip works with many leafy herbs. Check out my parsley!

My current batch of cilantro, can you believe it is more than six weeks old? No slime in sight!

I hope you try this technique to make your fresh herbs last longer!

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