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Home gardening tips: 17 Veggies you can grow in buckets

If you live in a small home or apartment, you don’t need to give up your dreams of having your own garden or growing our own vegetables. You can start your journey to self-sufficiency by growing nutritious vegetables in a bucket garden. Here I have some awesome tips to do just that! Growing your veggies using bucket or pots are an awesome way to get started. 🙂

Tips for starting a bucket garden

Once you get your food-grade buckets, prepare them for planting. Drill or punch a few holes in the bottom of the bucket. One hole about every three inches should do it.

Leave about two inches of loose gravel in the bottom of the bucket for better drainage. Then fill the buckets with a high-quality potting soil mix that includes peat moss and compost. Leave enough room for the plants themselves.

Plant either seeds or starter plants in five-gallon buckets. Water your crops well and check for the soil’s moisture level for further watering. Container plants usually need daily watering during summer because they can dry out rapidly.

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Here are 17 of the best vegetables to grow in five-gallon buckets:

Beans

Both pole beans and bush beans will grow well in buckets.

Pole beans, which are tall, vining beans, need trellis or pole supports for the vines inserted into the bucket before you sow the seeds to prevent damage.

Bush beans, which leaf out, not up, don’t require support. Try growing three plants per bucket.

Beetroot

Beetroots adapt well to buckets. Sow some seeds every couple of weeks from spring through early July for a continuous harvest.

Carrots

Standard carrots need a deeper container other than a bucket, but some short varieties will thrive in containers. Sow seeds at least two to three inches apart and keep the bucket in a sunny location.

Chilies

Chili plants thrive in warm and sunny areas, but they can adapt to a bucket kept in a sheltered spot that receives direct sunlight. Keep buckets indoors if there is any chance of frost.

Cucumbers

Bush-type cucumbers can be grown in five-gallon buckets full of a light, rich blend of compost, peat moss, or coconut coir and perlite. Water well.

Add a trellis or a tomato cage to help the cucumber plant grow up, not out. Water cucumbers thoroughly.

Green onions

Green onions, also called spring onions or salad onions, don’t need deep soil, making them perfect for bucket gardening. Sow onions half an inch deep into a bucket every few weeks from early spring through fall if you want a season-long supply.

Keep green onions watered in hot, dry weather.

Herbs

Kitchen herbs like mint, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage and thyme will thrive in a five-gallon bucket. You can let one plant spread and grow in one bucket.

Keep basil and coriander on your kitchen windowsill.

Lettuce

Most types of lettuce will grow very well in a five-gallon bucket. Plant as many as four heads per bucket.

Melons

Melons need space to grow so it’s best to plant only one melon plant per five-gallon bucket. Select dwarf bush varieties that will grow well in containers.

Okra

A single okra plant can grow well in a five-gallon bucket. Use well-drained soil and add holes in the buckets to make sure water is adequately draining as the plant grows.

Onions

Regular onions can be grown in buckets, but they need at least three inches of open soil around them to develop properly. Leave two to three onions per bucket.

Leave the bucket where it will receive plenty of light and fertilize regularly.

Peppers

Sweet peppers like Bell-Boy, Gypsy and Sweet Chocolate and hot pepper varieties such as Cubanelle, Jalapeno and Red Cherry grow best in buckets. Grow one plant per bucket.

Potatoes

Potatoes can grow in buckets because they need depth, not space.

Radishes

Plant at least 10 radish plants per five-gallon bucket. Sow the seeds about one inch deep and an inch apart. You can harvest the radishes after over a month. Re-sow for a continuous supply of radishes.

Swiss chard

Sow Swiss chard seeds an inch deep and thin out the seedlings as needed. Harvest regularly and cut away the outer leaves first.

Tomatoes

Cherry or bush tomatoes grow well in containers. Tomato plants require even watering.

Tomatoes are very susceptible to frost. Fertilize with high-potash fertilizer designed for tomatoes for better yield.

Support the plants with stakes or a cage as they grow. Water thoroughly but don’t leave puddles because the tomatoes will crack and split.

Zucchini

Zucchini plants need space to grow so choose compact zucchini varieties such as Eight Ball, Geode, Jackpot hybrid, or Raven.

Use food-grade buckets to grow vegetables in your own garden even if you don’t have a lot of space at home.

For more Home gardening tips Check out these awesome tips and tricks to start planning on how to grow your own garden with what you have.

How to grow lettuce in small spaces

Growing plants in a container is an awesome way for many people living in apartments or who have limited gradening spaces. It is also a good way to grow vegetation, as the containers can be brought indoors during the colder weather and left outdoors during spring.

Lettuce, a cool-season crop, develops best in cool but not chilling temperatures. Growing plants in containers also allows you to control weeds and pests more easily than in large gardening spaces. Not to mention, it affords you quick access to leaves for your salads.

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Choose the right container

Lettuce requires the right type of containers to plant them in. They need ample room for roots, but you can also grow several varieties in six to 12-inch pots. Lettuce can be grown in plastic or terra cotta planter pots, but you have plenty of other choices because they don’t require more than four inches of soil to anchor and thrive.

You can even grow lettuce in plastic gallon bottles that have openings on the sides. Buckets, large coffee cans without their lids, hanging baskets, boxes or even large plastic cups are all on the table. A four- to six-inch container can hold up to three lettuce plants.

Lettuce needs a consistent supply of moisture due to their water content, but it is important to note that they cannot tolerate wet roots, either.

Clay pots provide a permeable surface that allows excess water to evaporate. It also prevents soggy roots. Just make sure that there are adequate drainage holes in the type of container that you choose.

Use professional soil mix

Use professional soil mix for planting lettuce in containers. This mix is formulated to hold water and provide more nutrients for your vegetation. This mix is usually peat or compost soil, and has either vermiculite or perlite to help with water retention.

Depending on the size of your container, choose a lettuce mix labeled “cut and come again.” These offer repeat harvests. Other varieties that are good for small spaces include Black Seeded Simpson and the red or green oak leaf types. Moreover, loose-leaf lettuces are better suited for pots than head lettuce.

Growing lettuce in a container also needs attention and management. Planting lettuce in garden containers can be done by direct sowing or transplants. Once you have your soil ready, fill up your container almost to the top, leaving at least an inch of space for watering. Leave more at the top if you plan to mulch.

Transplanting lettuce heads

Before transplanting your lettuce heads, add half a tablespoon of time-release fertilizer per gallon of soil. Transplants should be buried a quarter of an inch deeper than they would be in garden soil and set six to 12 inches apart. Seeds can be sown when soils are not frozen at half an inch deep and four to 12 inches apart.

When growing lettuce in containers, always remember to water them. Lettuce has shallow roots and responds best to consistent shallow watering. Plants that are grown in the garden need at least an inch of water per week, but lettuce in pots needs a bit more.

Use a hydroponic system

You can also plant your lettuce using a hydroponic system. Start by using a storage bin that is at least 18 by 24 inches in size and holds up to 10 gallons of water or more. Mark eight evenly-spaced drill points on the lid and use a two-inch hole saw to drill holes in them. Add water until it is just one inch below the lid.

Mix the lettuce formula with two warm cups of water. Use a Masterblend Lettuce formula and Magnesium sulfate in the first cup and add calcium nitrate in the second cup. Follow the instructions on the packets for the best ratio. Stir until the chemicals fully dissolve. Add the mixes into the bin and stir.

Plant your seeds in a coco coir and place them over the holes of the container. Place outside or under grow lights. You should have lettuce in four to five weeks.

When harvesting, cut the outside leaves of loose lettuce when they are young. The leaves will then grow back and you can cut away the entire plant. Remember to cut them when they are tender as they are quick to “mature” and tend to become bitter.

Check out Gardening for more tips on planting in small spaces.

The digestive benefits of celery (quick salad recipe included)

 A popular low-calorie food, celery is a crunchy vegetable with many nutritional benefits. For one, celery helps boost digestive health. It’s also a great source of antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals.

The nutritional profile of celery

A single celery stalk only has 1o calories, but the vegetable is full of important antioxidants.

Antioxidants protect your blood vessels, cells, and organs from oxidative damage.

Celery is low in sodium and it’s also a good source of beta carotene, flavonoids, and immunity-boosting vitamin C. Additionally, celery contains phytonutrients that help minimize inflammation in your blood vessels, cells, digestive tract, and organs.

Celery has a low glycemic index, which means it has a slow, steady effect on your blood sugar, making it a great snack if you have diabetes. Celery also contains vitamins A and K, along with folate and potassium.

The health benefits of celery


It reduces inflammation. Studies suggest that chronic inflammation is associated with various health problems like arthritis and osteoporosis. Celery and celery seeds contain at least 25 anti-inflammatory compounds that help prevent these conditions.

It can boost your digestive health. Celery contains pectin-based polysaccharides.

The vegetable also has a high water content. Made up of at least 95 percent water, celery is also full of insoluble and soluble fiber.

Water and fiber are essential for a healthy digestive tract and regular bowel movements. A cup of celery sticks contains at least five grams of dietary fiber that boosts digestion.

It helps increase your stomach acid, which promotes smooth digestion and breaks down the food that you eat. Consuming celery helps relieve bloating and indigestion. (Related: Is celery the powerful anti-cancer weapon we have all been waiting for?)

How to cook and store celery


Healthy celery leaves are crisp and fresh. Look for celery with pale to bright green leaves and don’t buy celery with yellow or brown patches.

When buying celery, look for sturdy, upright stalks. The stalks should snap easily, not bend, when you pull them.

Chop celery before cooking or serving. This helps maintain the vegetable’s essential nutrients.

It is best to consume steamed celery, which retains flavor and almost all of its nutrients.

Celery leaves have the most calcium, potassium, and vitamin C. The leaves don’t store well, so consume celery leaves after a day or two of purchase.

Celery is a versatile vegetable. It can be eaten raw as a snack, baked or steamed, or added to green smoothies, juices, salads, or soups.

Recipe for celery stalk salad with apples, goat cheese, grapes, and pecans


The celery salad recipe below is from “Ruffage,” a cookbook written by chef Abra Berens.

This yummy salad combines refreshing ingredients like apples, celery, and grapes. The recipe also includes crunchy toasted pecans and smooth, creamy goat cheese.

Serve this celery salad as a main or as a side to a meat-based dish.

Ingredients:

1 head (4 cups) of celery, remove the root end and stalk tips, cut the stalks in diagonal slices and set the leaves aside
1 pound of grapes, halved
1 tart apple, cut into ¼-inch slices
1 cup pecans, toasted
½ cup olive oil
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
¼ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon black pepper, freshly ground
4 ounces organic, fresh goat cheese

Steps:

Combine the chopped celery, celery leaves, grapes, apple, pecans, olive oil, apple cider vinegar, salt, and pepper in a bowl.
Taste the salad, and add seasoning as desired.
Transfer the salad to a serving platter, then add the goat cheese before serving.

Including nutritious vegetables like celery and follow a balanced diet to boost your digestive health.

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