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Mexican Quinoa Salad Recipe

This Mexican-style Quinoa Salad is loaded with black beans, corn, tomatoes, avocados, red onion, and cilantro. Simple, healthy, and incredibly delicious, you’ll want to make it over and over again!

Let’s Just Jump Right To The Recipe!

Tex Mex Quinoa Salad

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 cups cooked quinoa*
  • 1 can black beans, rinsed
  • 1 cup corn frozen and thawed, or canned
  • 2 small avocados
  • 2 cups cherry tomatoes, chopped
  • ½ medium red onion, diced
  • ½ cup chopped cilantro
  • 2 limes, juiced
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 tsp. salt or to taste
  • 1 tsp. pepper or to taste
  • 1 tsp. cumin powder or to taste
  • ⅛ tsp. cayenne optional

INSTRUCTIONS 

  • Place the cooked and cooled quinoa into a large bowl. Add the black beans, corn, onion, tomatoes, avocados, and cilantro.
  • Squeeze the limes, grizzle with olive oil, and season the salad with salt, pepper, and cumin powder. Add a pinch of cayenne pepper, if preferred. Mix everything well.

NOTES

* You’ll need to cook about ¾ cup of quinoa according to the package instructions and cool it completely. Leftover quinoa is perfect for this salad. 

Cook quinoa in vegetable broth for extra flavor. 

HOW TO STORE THIS SALAD

Store this Quinoa Salad in an airtight container, refrigerated, for up to 2 days. You can still eat it on day 3, but the avocados will brown, and the tomatoes become a bit soggy.

Healthy Banana Ice Cream

Banana Ice Cream-the main ingredient is bananas! Easy to make, naturally sweet, healthy, milk free optional and low calorie. Have fun with this recipe and switch it up to your liking! A perfect treat for any day!

Don’t throw out those browning bananas! Chop and freeze them to make delicious and easy banana ice cream with just one ingredient: bananas.

How to Make Banana Ice Cream

Most times I buy bananas, there’s one or two that go brown before we eat them. This is a great way to save those bananas and turn them into a healthy frozen treat!

Step 1: Chop the bananas and freeze them
I chop the bananas about 1/2″ thick and them put them in a sealable plastic baggie. The secret to this recipe is freezing the bananas first! The cool thing is that you don’t need to use them right away so you can save those browning bananas and then make the ice cream anytime later.

Step 2: Put the bananas in a blender allow to melt for just a few minutes and start blending
If your bananas were a little mushy or they’ve been frozen for a while, you’ll need to seperate them before blending. You don’t want to put a solid frozen chunk in there or it won’t easily blend. I just take the baggie and slam it on the counter, or even the floor until the contents are broken up a bit.

I don’t have a favorite blender setting for the blending portion. I mostly press random options until I see things start to move. Sometimes I pour a little milk or cream in at this point, to get things moving better, but that is completely optional.

The bananas will look all chunky at first and you’ll probably have to repeatedly shove them down and blend. This part always takes some effort and perseverance.

Step 3: Keep blending until it looks like banana ice cream
Just keep at it and eventually it will start to look like ice cream! I usually switch to the “smoothie” setting on the blender for this part. Once you have the right consistency it will be smooth and moving on its own.

Step 4: Pour into a bowl and serve
Once it starts to look like ice cream, it’s time to pour it in a bowl and eat it right away! I’ve found it doesn’t refreeze all that well, so just make the amount you plan on eating.

An interesting thing to note- it doesn’t taste overly “banana-y.” It tastes mostly like vanilla ice cream with a hint of banana. It’s also naturally sweet and can be made with purely bananas, or you can mix in cream, honey, peanut butter powder, etc. and make your own unique blend. Add your favorite toppings like fruits or cinnamon! Enjoy!

Maria J 💜 – The Naturally Blooming

If you’d like more homemade Ideas check out my other recipes and be sure to subscribe to my free newsletter for lastest recipes and fun handmade projects sent straight to your inbox 📨

Home gardening tips: 17 Veggies you can grow in buckets

If you live in a small home or apartment, you don’t need to give up your dreams of having your own garden or growing our own vegetables. You can start your journey to self-sufficiency by growing nutritious vegetables in a bucket garden. Here I have some awesome tips to do just that! Growing your veggies using bucket or pots are an awesome way to get started. 🙂

Tips for starting a bucket garden

Once you get your food-grade buckets, prepare them for planting. Drill or punch a few holes in the bottom of the bucket. One hole about every three inches should do it.

Leave about two inches of loose gravel in the bottom of the bucket for better drainage. Then fill the buckets with a high-quality potting soil mix that includes peat moss and compost. Leave enough room for the plants themselves.

Plant either seeds or starter plants in five-gallon buckets. Water your crops well and check for the soil’s moisture level for further watering. Container plants usually need daily watering during summer because they can dry out rapidly.

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Here are 17 of the best vegetables to grow in five-gallon buckets:

Beans

Both pole beans and bush beans will grow well in buckets.

Pole beans, which are tall, vining beans, need trellis or pole supports for the vines inserted into the bucket before you sow the seeds to prevent damage.

Bush beans, which leaf out, not up, don’t require support. Try growing three plants per bucket.

Beetroot

Beetroots adapt well to buckets. Sow some seeds every couple of weeks from spring through early July for a continuous harvest.

Carrots

Standard carrots need a deeper container other than a bucket, but some short varieties will thrive in containers. Sow seeds at least two to three inches apart and keep the bucket in a sunny location.

Chilies

Chili plants thrive in warm and sunny areas, but they can adapt to a bucket kept in a sheltered spot that receives direct sunlight. Keep buckets indoors if there is any chance of frost.

Cucumbers

Bush-type cucumbers can be grown in five-gallon buckets full of a light, rich blend of compost, peat moss, or coconut coir and perlite. Water well.

Add a trellis or a tomato cage to help the cucumber plant grow up, not out. Water cucumbers thoroughly.

Green onions

Green onions, also called spring onions or salad onions, don’t need deep soil, making them perfect for bucket gardening. Sow onions half an inch deep into a bucket every few weeks from early spring through fall if you want a season-long supply.

Keep green onions watered in hot, dry weather.

Herbs

Kitchen herbs like mint, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage and thyme will thrive in a five-gallon bucket. You can let one plant spread and grow in one bucket.

Keep basil and coriander on your kitchen windowsill.

Lettuce

Most types of lettuce will grow very well in a five-gallon bucket. Plant as many as four heads per bucket.

Melons

Melons need space to grow so it’s best to plant only one melon plant per five-gallon bucket. Select dwarf bush varieties that will grow well in containers.

Okra

A single okra plant can grow well in a five-gallon bucket. Use well-drained soil and add holes in the buckets to make sure water is adequately draining as the plant grows.

Onions

Regular onions can be grown in buckets, but they need at least three inches of open soil around them to develop properly. Leave two to three onions per bucket.

Leave the bucket where it will receive plenty of light and fertilize regularly.

Peppers

Sweet peppers like Bell-Boy, Gypsy and Sweet Chocolate and hot pepper varieties such as Cubanelle, Jalapeno and Red Cherry grow best in buckets. Grow one plant per bucket.

Potatoes

Potatoes can grow in buckets because they need depth, not space.

Radishes

Plant at least 10 radish plants per five-gallon bucket. Sow the seeds about one inch deep and an inch apart. You can harvest the radishes after over a month. Re-sow for a continuous supply of radishes.

Swiss chard

Sow Swiss chard seeds an inch deep and thin out the seedlings as needed. Harvest regularly and cut away the outer leaves first.

Tomatoes

Cherry or bush tomatoes grow well in containers. Tomato plants require even watering.

Tomatoes are very susceptible to frost. Fertilize with high-potash fertilizer designed for tomatoes for better yield.

Support the plants with stakes or a cage as they grow. Water thoroughly but don’t leave puddles because the tomatoes will crack and split.

Zucchini

Zucchini plants need space to grow so choose compact zucchini varieties such as Eight Ball, Geode, Jackpot hybrid, or Raven.

Use food-grade buckets to grow vegetables in your own garden even if you don’t have a lot of space at home.

For more Home gardening tips Check out these awesome tips and tricks to start planning on how to grow your own garden with what you have.

How to grow lettuce in small spaces

Growing plants in a container is an awesome way for many people living in apartments or who have limited gradening spaces. It is also a good way to grow vegetation, as the containers can be brought indoors during the colder weather and left outdoors during spring.

Lettuce, a cool-season crop, develops best in cool but not chilling temperatures. Growing plants in containers also allows you to control weeds and pests more easily than in large gardening spaces. Not to mention, it affords you quick access to leaves for your salads.

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Choose the right container

Lettuce requires the right type of containers to plant them in. They need ample room for roots, but you can also grow several varieties in six to 12-inch pots. Lettuce can be grown in plastic or terra cotta planter pots, but you have plenty of other choices because they don’t require more than four inches of soil to anchor and thrive.

You can even grow lettuce in plastic gallon bottles that have openings on the sides. Buckets, large coffee cans without their lids, hanging baskets, boxes or even large plastic cups are all on the table. A four- to six-inch container can hold up to three lettuce plants.

Lettuce needs a consistent supply of moisture due to their water content, but it is important to note that they cannot tolerate wet roots, either.

Clay pots provide a permeable surface that allows excess water to evaporate. It also prevents soggy roots. Just make sure that there are adequate drainage holes in the type of container that you choose.

Use professional soil mix

Use professional soil mix for planting lettuce in containers. This mix is formulated to hold water and provide more nutrients for your vegetation. This mix is usually peat or compost soil, and has either vermiculite or perlite to help with water retention.

Depending on the size of your container, choose a lettuce mix labeled “cut and come again.” These offer repeat harvests. Other varieties that are good for small spaces include Black Seeded Simpson and the red or green oak leaf types. Moreover, loose-leaf lettuces are better suited for pots than head lettuce.

Growing lettuce in a container also needs attention and management. Planting lettuce in garden containers can be done by direct sowing or transplants. Once you have your soil ready, fill up your container almost to the top, leaving at least an inch of space for watering. Leave more at the top if you plan to mulch.

Transplanting lettuce heads

Before transplanting your lettuce heads, add half a tablespoon of time-release fertilizer per gallon of soil. Transplants should be buried a quarter of an inch deeper than they would be in garden soil and set six to 12 inches apart. Seeds can be sown when soils are not frozen at half an inch deep and four to 12 inches apart.

When growing lettuce in containers, always remember to water them. Lettuce has shallow roots and responds best to consistent shallow watering. Plants that are grown in the garden need at least an inch of water per week, but lettuce in pots needs a bit more.

Use a hydroponic system

You can also plant your lettuce using a hydroponic system. Start by using a storage bin that is at least 18 by 24 inches in size and holds up to 10 gallons of water or more. Mark eight evenly-spaced drill points on the lid and use a two-inch hole saw to drill holes in them. Add water until it is just one inch below the lid.

Mix the lettuce formula with two warm cups of water. Use a Masterblend Lettuce formula and Magnesium sulfate in the first cup and add calcium nitrate in the second cup. Follow the instructions on the packets for the best ratio. Stir until the chemicals fully dissolve. Add the mixes into the bin and stir.

Plant your seeds in a coco coir and place them over the holes of the container. Place outside or under grow lights. You should have lettuce in four to five weeks.

When harvesting, cut the outside leaves of loose lettuce when they are young. The leaves will then grow back and you can cut away the entire plant. Remember to cut them when they are tender as they are quick to “mature” and tend to become bitter.

Check out Gardening for more tips on planting in small spaces.

Cheesy Jalapeno Omelet

Spice up your morning with this easy and Cheesy Jalapeno Omelet. Made with eggs, jalapeno peppers, and your favorite cheese, this savory pepper omelet is the best way to start your day.

Recipe tips and substitutions

  1. To make it less spicy, remove the seeds and veins from the jalapeno.
  2. For deeper flavors, saute the diced jalapeno with chopped onions and garlic in the skillet before adding them to the scrambled eggs.
  3. Use different kinds of peppers to adjust the flavor and heat. Bell peppers are mild and sweet whereas poblanos are much spicier and smoky.
  4. Bump up the nutrients by adding in more veggies like tomatoes, onions, or chopped zucchini.
  5. Give it some protein by adding black beans, bacon, shredded chicken, or tofu to the mix.
  6. The cheese choice is yours! Feel free to use cheddar, swiss, cotija, queso fresco, pepper jack, or any cheese you enjoy.
  7. Do you like your omelets extra fluffy? Add a splash of milk or cream to the scrambled eggs.
  8. To keep your omelet from burning, make sure the skillet is not heated too high. This will scorch the outside and undercook the inside. Maintain an even medium heat and only flip the omelet when it’s ready!
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Ingredients

  • ▢ 6 eggs
  • ▢ 2 tablespoons milk
  • ▢ 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • ▢ 1 jalapeno seeds removed and finely diced
  • ▢ 1/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese
  • ▢ 1 tablespoon butter

Instructions

  • Crack eggs open into a medium-sized bowl and add milk, salt and jalapenos. Beat eggs with a fork to fully mix everything together.
  • Add butter to a large skillet over medium high heat. Once butter is melted, pour in 1/2 of the egg mixture into the skillet.
  • Cook eggs until firm, about 3-4 minutes. Add 1/2 of the cheddar cheese to one side, and then fold the other side over making an omelet. Continue to cook for 1-2 more minutes on both sides until crispy and fully cooked.
  • Remove from skillet and repeat directions to make the other omelet. Serve and enjoy!

did you make this?

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don’t forget to leave a comment & rating below! 🙂

Common household materials that make good organic fertilizer

Organic gardening is a good move. And if fertilizers are ever in short supply or outrageously priced, you’ll have some readily available options from around the house you can use instead.

Why is fertilizer necessary?

Dead soil equals dead plants.

On the other hand, living soil is full of nutrients and organisms integral to garden health.

Plants need certain nutrients to live and grow. To get these nutrients, they take them out of the soil. As a result, nutrients in the soil are depleted and must be replaced somehow.

Companion planting and crop rotation are two ways to replenish nutrient-depleted soil. Fertilizer is another.

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What nutrients are needed in the soil for plant growth?

There are three main groups of nutrients that healthy garden plants need in the soil:

Primary nutrients (which plants need in large quantities): Nitrogen (N), Phosphorous (P), and Potassium (K).

Secondary nutrients (which plants need in smaller quantities): Calcium (Ca), Magnesium (Mg), and Sulfur (S).

Micronutrients (which plants only need in trace amounts): Zinc (Zn), Iron (Fe), Boron (B), Manganese (Mn), Chlorine (Cl), and Molybdenum (Mo).

If a plant doesn’t receive these nutrients in the amounts they need, it won’t reach its full potential and may even die. So for your garden plants to be their best, a steady supply of plant food is a must.

What nutrients does MY soil need?

To know what your soil needs, you must test it. Otherwise, it’s just a guessing game that will likely result in money wasted on unnecessary fertilizers and plants that don’t develop to their potential.

Soil test kits for home use are readily available. Alternatively, contact a Cooperative Extension Office.

The results tell you what nutrients your soil lacks. This information, combined with what you want to plant, provides direction on the amount and type of fertilizer needed.

However, if the fertilizer you choose is potentially harming soil microorganisms while it’s replacing nutrients, well, you can see the problem.

What’s the difference between synthetic/chemical and organic fertilizers?

Short answer: Chemical and synthetic fertilizers feed the plant. Organic fertilizers feed the soil.

The advantages and disadvantages of synthetic/chemical fertilizers

Synthetic/chemical fertilizers are the fast food of the plant world. They’re designed to address the nutritional needs of the plant. The nutrients they put back into the soil are highly absorbable and contain specific nutrients in specific quantities.

However, they also have a lot of negative side effects.

For instance, they mess with the soil ecosystem; they’re typically quite acidic and hostile to beneficial microbes and other organisms. In addition, they’re harmful to people and pets, and they’re damaging to the environment.

As if that wasn’t enough, because they feed the plant, not the soil, they must be reapplied during the growing season unless using a time-released variety.

The advantages and disadvantages of organic fertilizers

On the other hand, organic fertilizers are part of the slow food movement. They have soil health uppermost in their minds, releasing nutrients over a more extended time. All those wonderful microbes and organisms we want living in our soil are more likely to thrive from a steady supply rather than bingeing. Soil structure and water retention can improve also.

It’s a matter of opinion whether the downsides to organic fertilizers are indeed disadvantages or just inconveniences.

For example, choosing organic is not a quick fix. It means you’re in it for the long haul. Some nutrients must be converted into a usable form for plants by those soil microbes. Concentrations are unlikely to be as high, and composition won’t be as precise as synthetic/chemical.

But like I said, these are only disadvantages if you’re looking for immediate results.

What materials can be used as organic fertilizer?

Here are some common materials that can make a great organic fertilizer. Some provide a very balanced mix of nutrients, and others will give you a few specific nutrients to target a deficiency. But, again, soil testing provides direction on your soil’s specific needs.

  • Material from compost supplies your garden with a very good mix of the nutrients it needs. It’s the single best thing you can do for your garden. For best results, make sure you add both green materials (things like kitchen scraps, which are high in nitrogen) and brown material (things like dried leaves and shredded cardboard, which are high in carbon).
  • Worm composting is a cool variation on the traditional compost heap. Adding certain worms to your compost helps break down the organic material faster. A regular compost heap might take months, but a worm composter takes mere weeks.
  • Chicken droppings don’t have to be just a smelly mess. Droppings can be an effective, reasonably balanced organic fertilizer for your garden. Don’t let this valuable resource go to waste if you have chickens as pets!
  • Coffee grounds sprinkled onto your soil supply nitrogen, potassium, and magnesium. Dry them first. Remember, though, that it could alter the pH of your soil. Ask for free coffee grounds at Starbucks or other coffee shops.
  • Ash from your fireplace dusted on soil contributes potassium and calcium carbonate. This, too, could change the pH of your soil.
  • Epsom salt supplies magnesium and sulfate to the soil. This is especially important with tomatoes, potatoes, and roses.
  • Powdered eggshells sprinkled onto your soil increase calcium carbonate (also known as “lime”). You can find eggshells that can be shipped to your door here.
  • Mix seaweed and water and let it sit for a few months to create a fertilizer high in potassium. You can also get some seaweed that is ready for your garden now.
  • Pine needles supply nitrogen. They also could alter the pH of the soil.

Why is soil pH important?

The pH of your garden soil determines the availability of nutrients for plants. If the soil pH is off, plants may show a deficiency in a nutrient even if that nutrient is in the soil. This is because the plant can’t access it because of the pH.

Whether a fertilizer raises or lowers soil pH depends on the soil’s original condition. For example, an item with a pH close to neutral, like used coffee grounds, will increase the pH of alkaline soil but decrease the pH of acidic soil.

Remember that soil testing kit I mentioned earlier? It’s your friend.

A Cheaper, Easier, Healthier Option

Using these everyday items as plant food for your soil is a cheap and easy alternative to synthetic chemical versions. In addition, choosing organic fertilizer is a small way to help to make the world a healthier place.

However, fertilizing is just one piece of the gardening puzzle. To learn what all the pieces are and how they combine to help you prepare for and create your best garden yet, check out these gardening tips here: GARDENING TIPS: 10 WAYS TO IMPROVE SOIL FERTILITY

What kind of organic fertilizer do you prefer?

Relaxing homemade Parsley Tea

Easy directions on how to make parsley tea using fresh and dried parsley. Have a healthy cup of tea within minutes! Low cost and filled with health benefits!

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Parsley tea is a low cost healthy tea that is filled with nutrition and health benefits. It has a fresh, grassy taste to it, making it a great natural tea to start your day with or end the night with. Because we grow parsley in the garden, I always try to add this to my daily tea schedule during the Summer months.

Parsley tea is made within minutes and can be made with both fresh or dried parsley.

If you’re looking for a new homemade tea, give this a try!

Ingredients

How to make fresh parsley

  • Add 3 tablespons of fresh parsley into tea mesh strainer or infuser ball and place in cup. Pour boiling hot water on top. Let steep for 5-10 minutes and remove strainer. You can drink as is, or sweeten with honey or sugar if preferred.

How to Make with Dried Parsley

  • Add 1 teaspoon dried parsley into tea mesh strainer or infuser ball and place in cup. Pour boiling hot water on top. Let steep for 5 minutes and remove strainer. You can drink as is or sweeten with honey or sugar if preferred.

Nutrition Information:


Serving: 1g Calories: 1kcal

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Healthy Homemade Tuna Salad

Healthy tuna salad is a light, refreshing meal packed with fresh herbs, crunchy garden cucumbers, and the delightful twist of freshly squeezed lemon juice. You can make so many different meals with this tuna salad! Here are some ideas!

Tuna sandwiches

Tuna cheese melts

Serve as a dip with carrots, celery, and crackers.

Add to the top of a bed of fresh lettuce.

Place sliced cheese on crackers with a small dollop of tuna salad on top.

Pita pocket with lettuce, tomato, and tuna salad.

Make it a wrap 

Serve it over some cooked pasta.

Swap out the celery for cucumber.

Make a Mexican version by adding cilantro, lime juice (instead of lemon), and a dash of cumin.

For some sweet crunch, dice up some fresh apples to add to the salad. Add walnuts for some Waldorf inspiration.

Add diced hard boiled eggs.

YUM

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Healthy Homemade Tuna Salad Recipe

Ingredients

  • 4 cans tuna – I like Wild Planet
  • 1 recipe homemade avocado mayo
  • I lemon, juiced
  • 2 stalks celery, diced
  • 1/2 onion, finely diced
  • Handful fresh herbs (optional)
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

Make a batch of my favorite homemade avocado mayo. I promise you it is super simple.

In a large bowl, add canned tuna (drain, if needed) and mayo.

Dice onions and celery. If you have kids, I suggest dicing the onions into really small pieces.

Chop herbs and add to bowl. This step is totally optional, but fresh herbs add so much brightness and flavor to the salad.

Squeeze lemon juice over the top.

Mix well and serve.

Notes

  • Fresh cilantro is my favorite herb to add, but you could also add a handful of fresh parsley or basil.
  • This recipe utilizes my favorite homemade avocado mayo. You could substitute it for store-bought, if needed. Always opt for avocado mayo, because most other types are made with unhealthy, refined vegetable oils.
  • For extra lemon flavor, add the zest of one lemon.
  • Tuna packed in water, olive oil, or just salt will work with this recipe. Make sure to drain the tuna before making this recipe.
  • Try to pick the best quality tuna you can afford. Wild and sustainably caught fish is the top choice.

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How to care for succulents and keep them alive

Here’s how to care for succulents, whether you’re just starting out or you’ve got a green thumb.

Everyone should know how to care for succulents. After all, these small, sweet plants can make a huge difference to your indoors. Whether they’re scattered around your home office, or dotted around your bedroom, succulents can improve your mood and give your decor a more natural finish. And while some can be very hardy, they still need some regular TLC; otherwise, you’ll end up looking for tips to save a dying plant.

That’s why we’ve pulled together this guide on how to care for succulents. We will look at what you should be doing, as well as what you need to avoid. So whether you’re new to the succulent-world or you’re a regular aficionado, there’s something here for everyone. Here’s how to care for your succulents and keep them thriving.

How to care for succulents

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1. Give them enough light — It might sound like common sense, but plants do need light to survive. So if you shut your succulents in an enclosed bathroom, they will inevitably die. Ideally, established succulents should get about six hours of full sun first thing in the morning, followed by partial shade for the remainder of the day.

If your succulent is more of a sapling though, too much sun can do some damage, so reduce the exposure as necessary. It’s also worth flagging that some succulents do require more light than others, especially those from the southern regions, such as cacti and yuccas. On the other hand, low light succulents also exist, such as snake plants and aloe vera.

2. Keep them watered and fed — An obvious point again, but many succulents are killed by either over or under-watering. And with so many being such a small size, this can be very easy to do. Succulents will naturally need more water in the summer, and less during the winter months. For general guidance, watering in the summer once a week is good practice, while as little as once a month may suffice in the winter.

You can always check how dry the soil feels using your finger — if the top inch feels dry, then it’s time to water. If you’re new to succulents, it’s also a good idea to use pots with drainage holes. This prevents you from over-watering, and you can re-use any excess in the tray on other succulents. You can also add a small amount of fertilizer during the spring or summer months to help with growth. We recommend Miracle-Gro Succulent Plant Food ($8.40, Amazon).

3. Watch the temperature — While succulents are pretty hardy, few will survive temperatures which drop below freezing, so keep them tucked up indoors during the colder months. Likewise, if the temperature is too high, say above 90°F, this too will kill most succulents.

Ideally, you want the temperature to range from 40-80°F for your plants to stay happy. But, remember, the higher the temperature, the more often they will need watering.

4. Rotate your pots — Wherever you’ve placed your succulents, odds are one side is not getting as much light as the other. Over time, this can result in your succulent growing in the direction of the sun and “leaning.”

Preventing this is easy: Simply rotate your plant every so often to give the other side some sun. This makes them look better and gives their growth better support.

5. Keep pests at bay — While you might think indoor succulents will be free from pests, think again. Gnats and mealybugs are attracted to damp soil and fertilizer, which can make them an unwelcome guest on your succulents.

First, you need to isolate any plants which show signs of infestation and clean the area to prevent it from spreading to others. Next, mix up a solution of one part 70 percent isopropyl alcohol and one part water. Then spray the soil as well as any pests you can see on the leaves to kill them. Make sure the succulent is free of pests before putting it back with the others.

6. Use the right soil — Soil does matter and you might be using the wrong stuff. You need a soil which isn’t too dense and allows for fast-draining, which means everyday compost won’t work. Instead, buy a dedicated succulent soil, such as The Succulent Cult Store’s Organic Potting Soil ($9.89, Amazon).

You should look to repot your succulents every two years; you should do this during its growing season. Just be careful with the roots, as these can easily be damaged.

7. Give the leaves a once over — It’s always annoying when you notice dust building up on the leaves. Some of us won’t do anything about it for fear of damaging the plant, but this myth needs to be busted.

Excessive dust can actually slow the growth of your succulent, so you’re better off getting rid of it. Plus, the colors will look much better without it. All you need to do is wipe the leaves down every so often with a damp microfiber cloth. You can also use a brush to reach any tight spaces.

For more planting tips, tricks, and how-tos, check out- Gardening


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HOMEMADE POTATO CHORIZO TACOS

Potato and Chorizo Tacos

Potatoes and chorizo or chorizo con papas are traditionally a breakfast dish, but I see no reason why this couldn’t be a good lunch or dinner option. 

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Ingredients
▢1 tbsp. Coconut oil optional
▢1 cup Onion white, minced
▢3 cups Potato peeled, diced
▢1 cup Vegan chorizo, cooked (see note)
▢12 Corn tortillas
▢1 cup Your favorite salsa

Instructions

1. Heat 1 tbsp. of oil in a large sauté pan at medium-low heat. Add onions and cook until soft and translucent, about 10 min. It’s ok if they brown a little bit.

2. While the onions are cooking, place your cut potatoes in a small saucepot with salted water. Bring the water up to a simmer at high heat. Lower heat to medium and let the potatoes cook for 5 minutes.

3. Drain the potatoes and add them to the pan with the onion. Turn heat up to medium-high. Cook potatoes and onions for 5 minutes or until the potatoes begin to brown. Add more oil if necessary.

4. Add cooked chorizo to the pan and mix well. Cook for one more minute.

5. Season with salt and pepper.

6. Serve with warm tortillas and the salsa of your choice.

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